Jun152018

Copenhagen Metro and public transportation

My summer trip started in Copenhagen, Denmark. This is my 5th stay in Copenhagen in three years, yet this is the first trip I primarily used Copenhagen’s city Metro, bus and S-Trains to get around the city.

Copenhagen Airport Kastrup CPH Metro station – Lufthavnen

Kiosk machines at CPH Airport at the Metro entrance sell City Pass tickets. Ticket kiosks are available at all Metro stations.

Metro ticket machine at Copenhagen Kastrup Airport CPH.

A train ticket or a Metro ticket from Copenhagen Airport costs 36 DKK ($5.60 USD). Both transportation services leave directly from the main terminal of the airport.

Copenhagen Metro Lines A (green) and B (yellow) run 24/7.

On past trips to Copenhagen when I stayed at Skt. Petri Hotel for 20,000 Choice Privileges points per night, I took the train from Copenhagen Airport to the central train station and walked the half-mile or so to Skt. Petri.

Turns out a trip on Metro B line from CPH airport to Norreport Station cuts the walking distance to about 300 meters from the Metro to Skt. Petri Hotel.

Norreport is a primary transportation hub for Copenhagen with bus and S-train service to other parts of the city and suburbs.

Norreport Station Copenhagen is a main transportation hub for city Metro, bus and S-trains.

Copenhagen City Pass for unlimited public transportation

I found City Pass to be the best deal for my needs on my last two trips to Copenhagen. The price is 80 DKK for 24 hours with a daily rate discount when you buy a multiple day City Pass.

24 hours = 80 DKK ($12.44 USD)

48 hours = 150 DKK ($23.33 USD) $11.67/day.

72 hours = 200 DKK ($31.10 USD) $10.37/day.

120 hours = 300 DKK ($46.65 USD) $9.33/day.

A single ticket to travel within central Copenhagen is 24 DKK, so it only takes three or four rides in 24 hours on the Metro, S-train or bus to save money with a City Pass.

We traveled by Metro, S-train and bus this week in Copenhagen. Metro is quick and neat.

Kelley noticed that Metro stations in Copenhagen are fairly free of commercial advertising in contrast to Prague and London, where escalator rides are a series of advertisement exposure.

Imagine a city commute with no advertising covering public transportation service.

Bus travel is a bit rougher bouncing on city streets over cobblestones with some sudden stops when traffic brakes unexpectedly or a cyclist gets in the way.

Traveling from Comfort Hotel Vesterbro near Central Station to see the Little Mermaid statue took a bus ride to Norreport Station, S-train to Osterport station and a walk to the Little Mermaid.

Copenhagen S-Train

Østerport Station S-train

Copenhagen, Denmark is a relatively expensive city. Low cost airline tickets are one of the few bargains that regularly takes me to Copenhagen. I generally only stay one or two days before flying off to some other more affordable destination in Europe or flying home to California.

Copenhagen to Kaunas, Lithuania cost $12 one way on Ryanair to go from Denmark $8 beer pints to $3 beer pints in the Baltics.

The Little Mermaid – Den lille Havfrue by Edvard Eriksen 1913

About Ric Garrido

Ric Garrido of Monterey, California started Loyalty Traveler in 2006 for traveler education on hotel and air travel, primarily using frequent flyer and frequent guest loyalty programs for bargain travel. Loyalty Traveler joined BoardingArea.com in 2008.

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Comments

  1. I just finished a trip to Oslo. That completes visiting all the scandinavian countries for me. Norway was by far the most expensive. I prefer visiting Denmark as I found it the best overall.

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