Mar032014

Hotel Wi-Fi Test lists Top Ten brands with fastest internet

The first Hotel Wi-Fi Test Report lists the Top Ten major hotel brands with the fastest measured internet speeds and a Top 100 hotels list.

The list of top hotel chains is:

1. Andaz     (Hyatt)

2. Le Meridien     (Starwood)

3. Radisson Blu     (Carlson)

4. Four Points     (Starwood)

5. Scandic     (Scandic, chain of 154 hotels primarily in Scandinavian countries; HQ in Stockholm)

6. Sheraton     (Starwood)

7. Crowne Plaza     (InterContinental Hotels Group)

8. Marriott     

9. Hyatt     

10. Residence Inn (Marriott)

Hilton is the notable hotel chain absent from this list with no brands making the top ten.

Hotel WiFi TEst

HotelWiFiTest.com

One of the cool features of the site is hotel guests can conduct a hotel WiFi speed test on the spot while in a hotel.

Hotel WiFi Speed Test

There is also list of cities around the world where tested hotels are ranked for WiFi speed.

A look at the Top 100 revealed a few Hilton hotels including DoubleTree by Hilton Chicago Arlington Heights at #3 ahead of Radisson Blu Amsterdam Schiphol Airport at #4.

In my area Hyatt Regency Santa Clara comes in at #30.

In a list with hotels like The Ritz London at #9, Renaissance Boca Raton at #19 and Ghent Marriott in Belgium at #42 is an independent motel called the Monterey Surf Inn at #69 located about a mile from my home on Munras Avenue in Monterey.

Monterey Surf Inn

Monterey Surf Inn ranks #64 on Hotel Wi-Fi Test.

*****

Ric Garrido of Monterey, California is writer and owner of Loyalty Traveler.

Loyalty Traveler shares news and views on hotels, hotel loyalty programs and vacation destinations for frequent guests.

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About Ric Garrido

Ric Garrido of Monterey, California started Loyalty Traveler in 2006 for traveler education on hotel and air travel, primarily using frequent flyer and frequent guest loyalty programs for bargain travel. Loyalty Traveler joined BoardingArea.com in 2008.

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Comments

  1. My only comment is their data is probably pretty limited. I’ve been using it a reasonable amount recently, and each time it appears I’m the first person to run it in various hotels. Once I do the hotel suddenly shows up on the list of hotels in the area with fast Wi-Fi. Before I ran the test it didn’t. If I leave it running so that it retests every 15 minutes, the confidence level listed goes up astronomically. Certainly gives me the impression there wasn’t any data on the hotel before I tried it. This is for hotels in Silicon Valley (tech savvy, you’d think the most likely audience for this, the most likely to know about this site, run its tests) that are fully booked pretty much all the time.

    So take its reports with a grain of salt at the moment.

  2. Humm. While perhaps a great project, I don’t think that the results – simply brand, really mean much. At the end of the day, each hotel is a unique physical structure, each has its own challenges and, in most cases, the WiFi service is designed and implemented by a different vendor. A worthy score here means only that the individual house was probably engineered and configured by an excellent consultant. While the branded chains may have their own, in-house IT staff, this in-house kids specify and monitor standards; they do not design systems for individual houses.
    In my experience, hotel WiFi service can range world=class to nothing and from $25 to nothing. And at the end of the day it is truly a minimal cost service to provide. That said, many chains continue to consider it a Bonus Status Perk and one that they can often use to extract another few dollars or Euros from their other guests. I have far more respect for, and most often use hotels that include WiFi services as routine necessities like clean linens. And since you got me started, yes, WiFi and Bottled Water have a lot in common! While hotel tap water is always safe to drink in perhaps a dozen countries worldwide, savvy travelers do not. The idea that any hotel can extract an additional $1-$5 for a pint/half-litre of of water is disgusting. When I stay for more than a single quick overnight, I make it a point to buy my own bottled water. It may take a few minutes, but it is a great way to explore a little bit. And when the checkout clerk asks about water, I usually give them a polite but pointed mouthful about their abusive charges for water – a substance that SHOULD be both free and safe in any hotel, for two stars to to five stars. Have I been billed for water in four and five star hotels? Yes. And I refuse to pay! At the four/five level, I’ve never experienced a hard-ass who would not deduct the water fees when asked to do so. They probably make more than enough PROFIT from those who do not examine the bill or who do not have the balls to question anything. Water and WiFi are my pet peeves in even the very best of hotels. Period.

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